Harmony Music House
Masontown.JPG

House Concerts


Apr
8
7:30 pm19:30

Monocle Band

  • Harmony Music House

This is an all acoustic "house concert" style setting. Feel free to BYOB.
Doors open at 7pm.  Show starts at 7:30pm.
$20 Adv $23 at the door
All sales final. No refunds.

Formed in the musically fertile slopes of Colorado’s Front Range, Monocle Band offers a fresh and vibrant take on the roots acoustic music that has made Colorado one of the most exciting music scenes in the country. Monocle Band is Rocky Mountain Indie Folk…brand new, original music rooted in the traditions of Telluride bluegrass and the troubadour wanderings that led Townes Van Zandt through the San Juan Mountains on horseback. Always rooted in song, the group’s music flows from a stomping fiddle breakdown to a lost lover’s lament. This is original music, the acoustic sound of the spirit, innately authentic yet sonically aligned with the roots music revival enchanting the nation. Lighting up dance floors and breaking hearts across the Rocky Mountain west since 2011, MonocleBand blends stirring songcraft, flatpicked guitar, fiddle, mandolin, upright bass, and the most musical of drums into a sound that will move your body, mind, and soul.

Led by the sweet and soaring vocals of Monica Whittington, the Boulder, Colorado based quintet combines the best of song-craft and captivating performance. Monica (vocals, acoustic guitar) and songwriting partner Bill Huston (vocals, acoustic and electric guitar) have assembled an unparalleled ensemble of jazz-trained and roots-based musicians and have played over 350 dates since the bands the band’s inception. Filling out the quintet Dave Weinand (upright bass, vocal), Emily Lewis (violin, vocal) and Todd May (drums, percussion). As Colorado music legend Danny Shafer says, “Monocle’s instrumental ability is as strong as their connection to the audience. They always are able to give an engaging performance whether to a dancing crowd or a listening room.” Indeed, the band’s noted performances have led them to the main stage band competitions of the Telluride Bluegrass Festival and Rockygrass, countless venues across the Front Range, and to opening slots for The SteelDrivers, The Samples, and Ralph Stanley.

Monocle Band released their debut self-titled CD in October of 2013 to enthusiastic acclaim, gaining them the 25th most played CD on the National Folk DJ chart for the month of September 2013. The CD was recorded and produced at The Distillery in Lyons, Colorado by David Tiller (Taarka, ThaMuseMeant), the man behind the sounds of Elephant Revival’s first two albums, and features contributions from Grammy award winning lap steel guitarist Sally Van Meter and other noted guests. As Denver Westword magazine says this affecting batch of heartrending songs...genuinely possesses the kind of pastoral charm that so many others seem to be striving for these days but rarely achieve.” It is a snapshot of a moment in time: an acoustic rhythm backed by crackling drums, a shimmering curtain of electric guitars and violin, all of it lifting up the yearning tones of Monica Whittington’s vocals. Marquee Magazine calls the record “splendidly written and performed.”

Monocle Band’s debut recording is a musical postcard made even more poignant when The Distillery Studio in Lyons was washed away in the recent Colorado floods, just months after the record was finished. The album captures a band in its creative stride, a young group with a firm command of their craft and a steady gaze to the mountains and plains that lie before them.

Mar
25
7:30 pm19:30

An intimate evening with Finnders & Youngberg (FY5)

  • Harmony Music House

This is an all acoustic "house concert" style setting.  Feel free to BYOB.
Doors open 7pm. Show starts at 7:30.
$20 in advance, $23 at the door.  All sales final.  No refunds.


For decades now, Colorado has been a wellspring for American roots music, combining the traditional Appalachian old-time and honky-tonk strains of the East with the spirit of adventure and openness of the West. Colorado has served as a magnet for musicians looking to find themselves, and it’s become a place for musical kindred spirits to commune and create. FY5 –Finnders & Youngberg– represent this pioneering spirit, and with their latest effort, Eat the Moon, we can hear a newfound maturity and purpose that comes with steady gigging, dedication, and a renewed sense of purpose. Bluegrass harmonies, crisp as a mountain stream, meld with virtuosic picking and fiddling and the kind of honest acknowledgment of the tough realities of life that’s best found in traditional honky-tonk. “We’re proud to have come from the traditional folk and bluegrass school,” says bandleader Mike Finders, “yet we put all that aside and do our best to build the songs honestly, creatively, with no predetermined agenda to play this or that kind of music.” With Eat the Moon, FY5 brings us a self-assured vision of American music, rooted in tradition, but pointing to new creative directions that make it vital and relevant in today’s modern world.

If you’re looking for the source of this music, there’s a deep vein of country music that reaches all the way back to Appalachia and underpins both bluegrass and honky-tonk. But it takes an uncommon vision and a powerful band to unite the two as FY5 has done. Much of this connection is built through Aaron Youngberg’s facility on both banjo and pedal steel, but also through the gritty vocals of lead singer Mike Finders. You can hear traces of both Jimmy Martin and Lefty Frizzell in his voice, but he has a unique and unaffected sound of his own that comes through on all the original songs. Female vocalist Erin Youngberg does more than hold her own on lead vocals, and when these two voices join together as a duet, one can’t help but compare them to classic country duets like George Jones and Melba Montgomery or Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner. Combine these vocals with rapid-fire mandolin picking from Rich Zimmerman that, though clean and precise, still contains a gritty edge, and masterful fiddling from renowned violinist Ryan Drickey, and you’ve got the driving force ofFY5.

On Eat The Moon, all these elements combine in a partnership that recalls a time before roots music became watered down or overly polished. FY5’s synergy of styles carries the traditions of what came before with the frontier elements of the West, giving their music a sense of freedom and adventure that sounds fresh to our ears. If you’re searching for the ensemble that will bridge the gap between the Smokies and the Rockies, between East and West, old and new, this is for you.